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In The Room Where it Happens

We may not all like to be the center of attention, but on many counts we do like to be “in

the know.” We may not like to consider ourselves gossipers, but we do get curious when we learn about some “juiciness” that is present in someone else’s life. Take a look at the headlines that cross the page trying to get our attention. You read one headline, and open the article, then that leads to another, and the next thing you know, it’s 23 minutes later; and you say to yourself, “I’ll never get those minutes back.” And those ads that track our interests make it even worse as they bring up more like stories. It’s a lot like the Lay’s potato chip commercial, “You can’t eat just one.” Why are we so intrigued with what is going on in others’ lives - whether they be celebrities, entertainers, politicians, sports figures - why are we so curious of what makes them who they are, as if they are superhuman. Well they are, to some extent, but we all know they put their pants on one leg at a time just like us.


What makes them different is that they have a real desire to be in the room where it happens.


I was in the room...


This phrase “in the room where it happens” is one of my favorites in the musical Hamilton.

I was fortunate to have attended a recent performance of Hamilton at the Lied Theatre in Lincoln, NE.


To get us all on the same page with a basic understanding of the show and of history - the story centers around Alexander Hamilton's unlikely immigrant path to America, the Revolutionary War (where he served as George Washington's right-hand man) , the creation of the United States, affairs, political rivalries with Aaron Burr and Thomas Jefferson, and multiple tragedies. In addition, there are important mental health and life lessons that are covered. - courage, perseverance, and believing in yourself even though conventional wisdom suggests giving up.


What's Your Connection?


If you have seen the show, consider which character you connect with the most. For some it may be the main character, Alexander Hamilton, an orphaned immigrant that feels like he has to work twice as hard as everyone else. For others, it could be one of the Schuyler sisters (Angelica, Eliza, and Peggy). Or maybe you connect to Thomas Jefferson, Aaron Burr, George Washington, or Hamilton’s son, Philip?


This connection that we feel, is the part that encourages us to be in the room where it happens with and for that character. It is that intense feeling that creates our emotional response. At the moment that connection connects with us, we feel that impetus to act, to do something of significance. What is it that you want to do, to experience, to create, to initiate, to be a part of? What drives you to the point of wanting to make a difference? How does that make you feel? Are you feeling some excitement due to the emotional release?


Or does something else now flare up? Does your negative self now step in front of the hero of your own story? Do you hear words like “What are you doing?”, “What are you thinking?”, “You are not cut out to be this kind of hero.”


Is this what stops you?


Is this what blocks you from becoming your own version of YOUR Hamilton character?


Who says that you can’t do it?


Is there really any true evidence?


Likely NOT - so, to take another line from Hamilton, tell yourself, “I’m not giving away my shot!”


The Next Step...


If you are ready to live the version of the story that most excites you - Then what is one step that puts you on that path? What is one thing that you can do today?


And when will you get that done? Can you promise yourself that you will do this one simple thing?


When will you meet with yourself to plan step two?


If you need someone in your corner, let’s talk!


I want you to be in the room where it happens!


Let me leave you with one last comment from one of my mentors, “If you hear that voice in your head tell you that you can’t or that you are not good enough, Do something in the opposite direction to counteract that voice, immediately!” Paul Martinelli


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